Fall 2007

Welcome to the Renaissance Body Seminar, Fall 2007 download the course syllabus (PDF). Class: M 2:15-5:05Location: 260-003

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts, the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine, and how did it stage the aesthetic, religious, philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion, or deconstruction, of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body, or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual, emotional and political ideas?
The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functions as a reminder of human mortality and is caught in the web of gender issues.
The class will use a new website designed specifically for the course, with a collective blog, private e-diary, an archive of 16th century images and texts, and a creative interface where students have the option to publish online essays or multimedia projects.
Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais), poetry (Scève, Ronsard, Labé, D’Aubigné), essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores, tapestries, paintings, blazons, and anatomical plates from medical books.
Readings and class discussion mostly in French.

Pierre de Ronsard (1524-1585)

Portrait de RonsardPortrait de Ronsard (Les Amours, 1552)

 

Pierre de Ronsard (1524-1585) was born at the Château de la Poissonniere, in the province of Vendomois, to a noble family. Educated at the Collège de Navarre in Paris from age nine, Ronsard spent three years in England attached to the king’s service as a page following the marriage of Madeleine de France to James V of Scotland. When he returned to France in 1540, he joined the service of the Duke of Orléans, then became a secretary to Lazare de Baïf, the father of his future fellow-poet in the Pléiade, Antoine de Baïf. His apparently promising diplomatic career was cut short by a sudden and incurable deafness. Ronsard devoted himself to study at the Collège de Coqueret, where the principal, Jean Dorat, taught Greek and Latin and introduced Ronsard to a high vision of literature and humanism. Dorat’s pupil Antoine de Baïf accompanied Ronsard, and was soon followed by Belleau and Joachim du Bellay, who was to produce in 1549 the Défense et illustration de la langue française, widely considered the founding gesture of the Pléiade movement.
Ronsard’s first major literary work came with the publication of the Quatre premiers livres des Odes in 1550, where he attempted to revive ancient lyric poetry in the form of Pindaric and Horatian odes. This somewhat bombastic gesture drew sharp criticism and the mockery of court poet Saint-Gelais. The ensuing polemics opposed a young generation of ambitious poets led by Du Bellay and Ronsard who aspired to imitate and rival with classical and Italian poetry, and the admirers of Marot, Saint-Gelais and a more traditional canon of French poetry. Ronsard’s next literary achievement, the Amours (1552), brought him this time fame and popular success: he reconciled soon after with Saint-Gelais and became the leading court poet. Though undoubtedly marked by Petrarchan influences, this love sonnet sequence dedicated to Cassandre displays Ronsard’s unique talent and hedonist inspiration. The rhetorical and imagistic patterns inherited from the Italian poet (the emotional landscape of piercing arrows, filters and poisons) are detached in the Amours from their context of mystical adoration, and instead imbued with a vivid sensuality that significantly alters their reading. The frequent references to metamorphosis in the Amours speak to the quality of the poet’s own desires: he portrays himself transformed as a bouquet in the hand of the beloved, the water in her bath, the rain of gold upon her breast, a flea kising her skin, granting him a taste of the voluptuousness is unfulfilled desires aspire to.
Enjoying an immediate and overwhelming popularity, Ronsard went on to publish his Hymnes, dedicated to Marguerite de Valois, in 1555, the Continuation des Amours and Nouvelle Continuation des Amours dedicated this time to Marie in 1555-1556. He collected his Oeuvres as early as 1560, and was to polish and rearrange them continuously until his death.
Extraordinarily well-known and respected during his lifetime, he was honored with gifts from Queen Elizabeth, and consulted by Tasso on the Gerusalemme. His work was not universally admired, however; during his lifetime he faced opposition by both the followers of Marot, who found his outspoken contempt of merely vernacular and medieval forms and his insistence that French poets “follow the ancients” an insult to the earlier poets, and the Huguenot faction antagonized by his strong connections to the royal family and the catholic party.

© Emily Dalton and Cécile Alduy.

 

Selective Bibliography:

Works by Ronsard:

“Hymne de la France” (1549)
“Ode a la Paix” (1549)
Les quatre premiers Livres des Odes de Pierre de Ronsard, Vandomois (1550)
Les Amours de Pierre de Ronsard, Vandomoys [Amours de Cassandre] (1552)
Hymnes (1555)
Continuation des Amours [Amours de Marie] (1555) ; Nouvelle Continuation des Amours (1556)
Elégies, mascarades et bergeries (1565)
Les Œuvres de P. de Ronsard gentilhomme Vandomois (1560; 1578, 1589…)
Quatre premiers livres de la Franciade (1572)
Sonnets pour Hélène (1578)
RONSARD, Pierre de, Œuvres complètes, édition critique par P. Laumonier, réed. par I. Silver et R. Lebègue, Paris, Hachette, S.T.F.M., 1914-1975, 20 tomes.
Critical Works:
CAVE, Terence, The Cornucopian Text. Problems of Writing in the French Renaissance, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1985.
DASSONVILLE, Michel, Ronsard. Étude historique et littéraire, Genève, Droz, 1968-1990, 5 vol.
KRITZMAN, Lawrence D., The Rhetoric of Sexuality and the Literature of the French Renaissance, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1991.
MÉNAGER, Daniel, Ronsard: le roi, le poète et les hommes, Genève, Droz,1979.
PY, Albert, Imitation et Renaissance dans la poésie de Ronsard, Genève, Droz, 1984.
RIGOLOT, François, Poésie et Renaissance, Paris, Seuil, “Point Essai”, 2003.
Ronsard en son IVe centenaire. actes du colloque international Pierre de Ronsard (Paris-Tours, septembre 1985), éd. Y. Bellenger, J. Céard, D. Ménager et M. Simonin, Genève, Droz, 1988-1989.
Ronsard in Cambridge, proceedings of the Cambridge Ronsard Colloquium, 10-12 April 1985, éd. par Philip Ford et Gillian Jondorf avec une introduction de Dorothy Gabe Coleman, Cambridge, Cambridge French Colloquia, 1986
ROUGET, François, Pierre de Ronsard, Roma, Memini, Bibliothèque des Écrivains français, 2006.
STURM-Maddox, Sara, Ronsard, Petrarch, and the “Amours”, Gainesville, University Press of Florida, 1999.

Online resources:
Encyclopedia Britanica (1919)

Students' Highlights:

"Ronsard conceived of the poet as a recipient of the divine inspiration of the Muses without which no amount of study could fashion a poet out of an ordinary mortal. For Ronsard, this inspiration was accompanied by a moral obligation to hold one’s poetic gifts as sacred and to channel them toward appropriately worthy matters. His lofty vision of the poetic mission stood in contrast to the conception of the poetic creation as craft or as a mere branch of rhetoric, that had prevailed in France in the years prior to the Pléiade. Like many of his fellow sixteenth century poets, Ronsard saw his art as mimetic: he believed his task was to imitate nature, to articulate the truths of particular objects, and to place these truths in relation to larger universal truths. Indeed, in his preface to the 1550 Odes he announces: “I am of the opinion that no Poetry should be held praiseworthy or finished unless it represents nature, which was esteemed beautiful by the ancients only because it was inconstant and variable in its perfections.” It is in part his determination to portray Nature’s varies abundance that underlies the dazzling variety of style and form that marks his literary production." (Emily Dalton)

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How to Use our Collective Blog

Bienvenue à tous,

 

Pour utiliser ce blog collectif et privé, cliquer sur "blogs" puis, "my blog" pour écrire un "post".
Chaque semaine, c'est sur ce blog que tous les étudiants posteront leurs questions sur les lectures et documents de la semaine, afin de commencer à réfléchir aux questions que nous discuterons en classe.

 

N'hésitez pas à poser autant de questions ou de commentaires que vous le souhaitez, et à répondre aux "posts" des autres. C'est l'occasion de continuer notre dialogue au-delà des frontières de la salle de cours.

 

Prêt? Partez... 

 

Cécile Alduy

conseil pour lire Montaigne

Comment le texte fonctionne : une écriture dans le temps.

Montaigne est un auteur difficile.
Le texte s’est écrit sur plusieurs années et en plusieurs “couches”. Vous verrez dans le livre des signes /A/ ; /B/ et /C/ qui correspondent à trois étapes de rédaction reflétées dans l’édition :
La couche A correspond à la premiere édition de 1580; la couche B aux additions de 1580-1588 qui seront publiées dans la derniere édition publiée par Montaigne de son vivant, en 1588.
La couche C correspond aux additions manuscrites qu’il a inscrites après 1588 et jusqu’à sa mort en 1595, sur son propre exemplaire de son livre de 1588.

Traduction et texte en ligne:
Si vous avez besoin d’une traduction, vous pouvez consulter avec profit la version bilingue de Donald Frame (ou la traduction seule) :

If you want an online translation, somewhat old (1685) but famous, you can see the Cotton translation in the Project Gutemberg website :
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3600/3600-h/3600-h.htm
Or choose the text only version :

If you want to see original pages from the French original edition of the Essais, along with a searchable text version, go to Montaigne Project :
http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/efts/ARTFL/projects/montaigne/index.html

You can click on the numbers in parenthesis to see the original page with Montaigne’s annotations.


Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p163

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p163

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p174

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p174

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p190

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p190

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p192

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p192

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p197

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p197

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p200

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p200

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p203

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p203

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p206

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p206

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p208

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p208

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p465

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p465

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p472

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p472

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p478

Vesalius, Andreas, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem. Basilæ : ex officina Ioannis Oporini, 1543.

See other images by Vesalius at the National Library of Medicine's Historical Anatomies on the Web.

 

Vesalius. De humani corporis fabrica. p478

Blasons anatomiques

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Le genre du blason, poème bref inauguré par Marot et que Sébillet définit comme « une perpétuelle louange ou continu vitupère de ce qu'on s'est proposé blasonner » (Art poétique français, 1548) connaît en France un succès éditorial certain autour des années 1536-1554. Le point de départ de cette mode poétique des blasons et des contreblasons est le célèbre « Blason du Beau Tétin » de Clément Marot, poème qui a inspiré plusieurs de ses contemporains à en faire des imitations. Les Blasons Anatomiques du Corps Féminin, d'abord publiés en annexe de l’Hecatomphile d’Alberti en 1536, 1537 et 1539 à Paris et à Lyon, paraissent dans une édition indépendante augmentée de « Contreblasons » ajoutés par Charles de La Hueterie en 1543, et sont de nouveau imprimés en 1550, 1554 et 1568. Ils sont accompagnés de bois gravés probablement commandés spécialement pour l'occasion.

Les Blasons anatomiques du corps féminin naissent d’une compétition poétique lancée par Marot lors de son exil à Ferrare en 1536. À sa suite, une quinzaine de poètes français dont Scève se lancent dans un genre poétique nouveau, le blason, et détaillent une à une les différentes parties du corps féminin. Le recueil juxtapose autant de poèmes – et d’auteurs – que de membres épars, disséqués en autant de morceaux d’anthologie, qui sont ensuite rassemblés selon l’ordre canonique des descriptions médiévales, de la tête au pied. Tandis que chaque poète s’empare, qui du bras, qui des cheveux, qui de la cuisse de la Femme idéalisée, le recueil dans son ensemble cartographie le territoire entier du féminin, des provinces les plus chastes et spiritualisées (l’œil, le front, la larme) aux domaines érotiques et scatologiques (sexe, pet, vessie). Ce faisant, le recueil en tant que corpus de textes se donne à lire comme une figure du corps entier : réciproquement, le corps humain devient le modèle interprétatif et le principe d’ordonnancement du livre. Dans ce chassé-croisé, corps et livre, textes et membres, mais aussi objet féminin de la description et sujets lyriques masculins, jouent de l’analogie des rapports entre tout et parties pour ériger un système symbolique de correspondances où le logos se fait l’instrument de conquête – amoureuse et scientifique – de la femme et du biologique.
© Cécile Alduy

 

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Source: Sensuient les blasons anatomiques du corps femenin, : ensemble les contreblasons de nouueau composez, & additionez, avec les digures, le tout mis par ordre: / composez par plusieurs poetes contemporains. Auec la table desdictz blasons & contreblasons imprimez en ceste annee. Paris: Pour Charles Langelier, 1543 (University of Virginia, Gordon Collection).

Délie

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Although Lyonnais poet Maurice Scève composed many other works, among them a biblical epic, an eclogue and some of the first French sonnets, he is mostly remembered and admired for his love poetic collection Délie (Lyon, 1544), for which he gained a reputation as the “Mallarmé” of the Renaissance.
Délie is composed of 449 decasyllabic dizains, or ten-line poems, after an eight-line introductory poem entitled “A Sa Délie.” “Délie” (an anagram of “L'Idée,”) long thought to be an imaginary ideal, may have alluded to the Lyonnaise poet Pernette du Guillet, whose death seems to have partly inspired Scève’s Saulsaye, églogue de la vie solitaire (1547). Regularly interspersed within the sequence are 50 emblèmes, made up of an image and a motto, usually echoed in the last line of the following poem thus called “dizain d’accompagnement.” The woodcuts’ sources range from Greek fables, Christian mythology or medieval bestiaries to scenes form everyday life activities or images from the natural world. The problematic relation between image and text, within the woodcut’s constitutive elements (motto and image) and between the vignette and the subsequent poems, has been the focus of many critical inquiries. It reflects a dominant issue raised by the collection as a whole: its so-called poetic “obscurity,” or, more to the point, the constant hermeneutic quest this complex system of cross-references and allusions calls forth.
The conception and the language of the collection spring from the Petrarchan tradition, but are distilled through the incorporation of a rich array of other influences synthesized by an original creative mind. Unlike in Dante and Petrarch, for example, the sublimation and purification of the love between the poet and the lady is not brought about by the lady’s death and adoption of the role of intermediary to salvation. Rather, Délie chronicles a love whose psychology is more human and realistic; though the faith of the lovers gradually evolves throughout the poem, it is never absolutely free of doubt, just as their relationship is never entirely separated from physical desire. Though Scève’s epigrams, which have been regarded with new critical interest in the last century, were considered difficult even by his contemporaries, he was widely praised during his time for having composed poetry that helped to establish French as a literary language. Scève’s Délie, the first French work modeled off Petrarch’s Canzoniere, inspired a number of later works in the same vein, including Ronsard’s Les Amours de Cassandre and Du Bellay’s Olive.
© Emily Dalton & Cécile Alduy

Students’ Interpretative Highlights:


On Délie: “The collection’s innovation lies also in its exploration of the role of memory and retrospection in the evolution of the love relationship; the speaker of Délie must rely on memory to actively reconstruct past suffering in order to transform it into a transcendent recollected experience.” Emily Dalton, Renaissance Body Seminar 2006.

Nous donnons ci-dessous uniquement les gravures de l'édition de 1564 (Source: University of Virginia, Gordon Collection). Login pour voir toutes les pages.  Voir toutes les images sur une page

Les femmes?

I wanted to ask about the status of women in this second half of Gargantua. In chapter 37, Gargamelle dies, and our rarely-heard-from first-person narrator appears to comment on it, if only to say "no comment": "Pour ma part, je n'en sais rien et je me soucie bien peu ni d'elle ni d'aucune autre." At this point, foggy-headed as I was, I realized, hey, that's right, there hasn't been much on female characters in this story, at least not for a while. Clearly, it's because the narrator doesn't care. Then, two chapters later, Frere Jean asks the very un-monklike question, "pourquoi les cuisses d'une demoiselle sont-elles toujours fraiches?" First of all, how does he know?! Getting past that, he goes into quite the descriptive explanation, offering his "trois raisons qui font qu'un lieu est naturellement rafraichi" (p287). For a narrator, or "author," who's not interested in women, there's quite a lot of information about the female body packed into a few short lines here...all told by a character who supposedly is celibate (is that true?). So, the narrator's not interested in women, the monk has no experience, Gargantua is too philosophically refined, and yet here is a juicy scene about the female body. What's going on?

p038. Delie. La Girouette

Emblème 15, "La Girouette." Devise: "Mille revoltes ne m'ont encor bougé."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p038. Delie. La Girouette

p008. Delie. La Lampe et l'Idole

in

Emblème 3, "La Lampe et l'Idole." Devise: "Pour te adorer je vis."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p008. Delie. La Lampe et l'Idole

p125. Delie. Le Tombeau et les Chandeliers

Emblème 50, "Le Tombeau et les Chandeliers." Devise: "Apres la mort, ma guerre encor me suyt."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p125. Delie. Le Tombeau et les Chandeliers

p123. Delie. Le Chamoys et les Chiens

Emblème 49, "Le Chamoys et les Chiens." Devise: "Me saulvant je m'enclos."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p123. Delie. Le Chamoys et les Chiens

p120. Delie. La Mousche

Emblème 48, "La Mousche." Devise: "Plus se hante moyns s'apprivoyse."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p120. Delie. La Mousche

p118. Delie. La Femme qui bat le Beurre

Emblème 47, "La Femme qui bat le Beurre." Devise: "Plus l'amollis plus l'endurcis."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p118. Delie. La Femme qui bat le Beurre

p115. Delie. L'Yraigne

Emblème 46, "L'Yraigne." Devise: "J'ay tendu le lacs ou je meurs."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p115. Delie. L'Yraigne

p113. Delie. La Lampe sur la Table

Emblème 45, "La Lampe sur la Table." Devise: "Le jour meurs et la nuict ars."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p113. Delie. La Lampe sur la Table

p110. Delie. Le Mort resuscitant

Emblème 44, "Le Mort resuscitant." Devise: "Plus que ne puis."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p110. Delie. Le Mort resuscitant

p108. Delie. L'Horloge

Emblème 43, "L'Horloge." Devise: "A mon labeur jour et nuict veille."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p108. Delie. L'Horloge

p105. Delie. Le Vespertillon ou Chauve-Souris

Emblème 42, "Le Verspertillon ou Chauve-Souris." Devise: "Quand tout repose point je ne cesse."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p105. Delie. Le Vespertillon ou Chauve-Souris

p103. Delie. Léda et le Cygne

Emblème 41, "Léda et le Cygne." Devise: "Cele en aultruy ce qu'en moy je descouvre."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p103. Delie. Léda et le Cygne

p100. Delie. Le Coq qui se brusle

Emblème 40, "Le Coq qui se brusle." Devise: "Plus l'estains plus l'allume."

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p100. Delie. Le Coq qui se brusle

p098. Delie. L'Arbaletier

Emblème 39, "L'Arbaletier." Devise: "Plus par doulceur que par force."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p098. Delie. L'Arbaletier

p095. Delie. Europa sur le Boeuf

Emblème 38, "Europa sur le Boeuf." Devise: "A seurté va qui son faict cele."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p095. Delie. Europa sur le Boeuf

p093. Delie. La Lune en Tenebres

Emblème 37, "La Lune en Tenebres." Devise: "Ma clarté tousjours en tenebre."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p093. Delie. La Lune en Tenebres

p090. Delie. Le Pot au Feu

Emblème 36, "Le Pot au Feu." Devise: "Dedens je me consume."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p090. Delie. Le Pot au Feu

p088. Delie. L'Âne au Molin

Emblème 35, "L'Âne au Molin." Devise: "Fuyant peine travail me suyt."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p088. Delie. L'Âne au Molin

p085. Delie. Le Paon

Emblème 34, "Le Paon." Devise: "Qui bien se voit orgueil abaisse."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p085. Delie. Le Paon

p083. Delie. Le Chat et la Ratière

Emblème 33, "Le Chat et la Ratière." Devise: "La prison m'est dure, encor plus liberté."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p083. Delie. Le Chat et la Ratière

p080. Delie. Le Muletier

Emblème 32, "Le Muletier." Devise: "Double peine a qui pour aultruy se lasse."

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p080. Delie. Le Muletier

p078. Délie. Le Papillon et la Chandelle

Emblème 31, "Le Papillon et la Chandelle." Devise: "En ma joye douleur."

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p078. Délie. Le Papillon et la Chandelle

p075. Délie. Cleopatra

Emblème 30, "Cleopatra." Devise: "Assez vit qui meurt quand veult."

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p075. Délie. Cleopatra

p073. Délie. La Scie

Emblème 29, "La Scie." Devise: "Force peu a peu me mine."

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p073. Délie. La Scie

p070. Délie. Le Fourbisseur

Emblème 28, "Le Fourbisseur." Devise: "Mon travail donne a deux gloire."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p070. Délie. Le Fourbisseur

p068. Délie. La Vipere qui se tue

Emblème 27, "La Vipere qui se tue." Devise: "Pour te donner vie je me donne mort."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p068. Délie. La Vipere qui se tue

p065. Délie. La Lycorne qui se voit

Emblème 26, "La Lycorne qui se voit." Devise: "De moy je m'espouvante."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p065. Délie. La Lycorne qui se voit

p063. Délie. La Selle et les deux hommes

Emblème 25, "La Selle et les deux hommes." Devise: "Facile a decevoir qui s'asseure."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p063. Délie. La Selle et les deux hommes

p060. Délie. La Cognée et l'Arbre

Emblème 24, "La Cognée et l'Arbre." Devise: "Te nuysant je me dommage."

Access the entire work at UVA's Gordon Collection.

p060. Délie. La Cognée et l'Arbre
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